Game News

G2A asked 10 outlets to publish non-disclosed promotional pieces

Published: 11:10, 09 July 2019
No More Robots
Promotional image for Descenders
Descenders

G2A saw another wave of controversy recently with indie developers taking issue with the site once again. It resulted in G2A trying to improve their image with offers of paying sites for publishing pre-written propaganda advertorials.

Key reseller website G2A recently came under fire after several indie developers raised some awareness of the site's destructive business model. G2A's PR attempts at saving face didn't go well and the latest one completely blew up in their face.

The website was targeted by several indie developers but Mike Rose was spearheading the onslaught. G2A attempted to paint a picture of Rose's claims being insignificant and even discredit him by stating he didn't even contact the key reseller.

He proved both claims wrong when he explained the numbers from G2A's own chart didn't match up to what they claimed and later when G2A retracted their statement , following Rose's threat to dump the email chain containing communication between the two parties.

With seemingly no other options, G2A started offering media outlets payment for publishing pre-written pieces that were supposed to build brand image. Sponsored posts are something that comes from a third party or is at least heavily influenced by them, meaning they rarely, if ever, reflect the actual editorial's opinions.

In other words, they would be paying these websites for puff pieces that were supposed to be propaganda that makes G2A look better than it is in reality.

Cherry on the cake was that the offer explicitly stated these texts could not be marked as sponsored content or in any way associated with G2A, which would obviously create the illusion that it was indeed these websites' opinion and not one written by G2A themselves.

No More Robots A cyclist from Descenders on a dirt track Descenders

In what is probably the weakest PR attempt of 2019 so far, G2A attempted to blame it all on one rogue employee who apparently acted without the company's authorisation. 

Not many people, if anyone, bought into this message but there it is. The exact number of contacted websites was revealed to be 10 in G2A's response linked above.

Latest Articles
Most Popular