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Rapper 2 Milly officially pursuing legal action against Epic

Epic Games
picture showing character running
Fortnite

After calling out Epic for stealing his dance just a couple of weeks earlier, rapper 2 Milly is now officially taking legal action against Fortnite's creator. This was confirmed by his legal representatives in a press release statement.

Rapper 2 Milly had some disagreements with Epic earlier this month when he claimed Epic stole his "Rock Milly" dance move and turned it into purchasable Fortnite emote. 2 Milly said he wouldn't take any further measures if Epic didn't decide to sell the Swipe It emote for $5.

"They actually sell that particular move. It's for purchase. That's when I really was like, no, this can't go on too long." the rapper said back then.

A couple of weeks forward and 2 Milly is officially taking legal action against Epic. Law firm Pierce BainBridge Beck Price & Hecht LLP has announced that they will be representing rapper 2 Milly in court where he'll take action against Epic for stolen dance moves.

If this isn't bizarre enough for you, 2 Milly's representatives took it even further by pulling out the race card. “This isn’t the first time that Epic Games has brazenly misappropriated the likeness of African-American talent,” it says in press release. Let's just say that this situation is a perfect example of the whole Fortnite culture.

2 Milly explained his decision by saying that Epic should have asked for his permission and offer him compensation for using his dance moves. "I was never compensated by Epic Games for their use of the Milly Rock, they never even asked for my permission," he said in the official statement.

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Back in September 2018, another rapper named Blocboy JB called out Fortnite for using his moves. Recently, Donald Faison, the actor who played Chris Turk in American sitcom Scrubs said that Epic Games "jacked" his dance which was originally created by him for the show.

According to American laws, the US copyright office doesn't grant copyright for individual dance moves and treats them more like words or expressions. But the big thing here is monetisation of those moves so it will be interesting to see how this one rolls out.