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Former Rockstar employee reveals an ugly truth of working there

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Not long after Rockstar's Dan Houser unwittingly reported on the brutal crunch time culture in the company, their former employee Job J. Stauffer stated that working on GTA IV was like having a gun pointed at your head for 7 days a week.

Needless to say, Houser's timing couldn't have been worse, what with their partners in crunch Telltale Games announcing the closing of the studio, with employees getting a notice of 30 minutes to pack up and get out. He has since insisted that the 100 hour weeks he mentioned were only for some senior employees, but by then - the cat was out of the bag.

Coincidentally, Stauffer also worked in Telltale, which may not seem particularly relevant but sure does help his credibility when discussing crunch. And it turns out that Rockstar's crunch is just as all-consuming as their games.

"It's been nearly a decade since I parted from Rockstar, but I can assure you that during the GTA IV era, it was like working with a gun to your head 7 days a week", wrote Stauffer in a tweet. Working Saturdays and Sundays was also part of the deal, since Sam and Dan "want to see everyone working as hard as them."

This seems to corroborate other reports that have since poured in, testifying to the relentless crunch time environment of what's certainly one of the most popular gaming properties in the world at the moment - Rockstar Games. The company had even had a row of sorts with wives of its employees back in 2009, issuing a lengthy statement to whomever it may concern.

Unfortunately, it didn't seem to concern Rockstar too much, as once you've brushed the linguistic niceties aside, they basically told them that if they don't like it - they can go look for employment elsewhere.

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That's not to say that Housers aren't working hard, because it's said that they're the first ones to pull 100 hour shifts when required. However, comparing the management's profits to those of its employees can quickly reveal why leading by example isn't quite a fair thing in this scenario.

You can find the tweet in question here.