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Codex cracking group traces Injustice 2 stutters to Denuvo

NetherRealm Studios
Poster for Warner Bros' Injustice 2, fighting game from DC Universe
Injustice 2

Prominent cracking group Codex have once again shown that it's better to ship a living, breathing cop with a game than strap it with Denuvo's anti-tamper technology, as they managed to pinpoint the source of Injustice 2's graphics woes.

Just in case you're not familiar with it, Injustice 2 is a fighting game similar to Tekken but set in a DC Universe. With Denuvo being a notoriously tough nut to crack though, Codex seem to have picked their battles and only came round to cracking Injustice 2 recently.

What they found however is the sort of thing that would make a development team facepalm until something turned red. Namely, the stuttering that occurs in Injustice 2 when using Robin and Gorilla is actually Denuvo's doing. 

Codex went in detail saying, "when Robin does one of his special attacks, throwing a smoke bomb on the ground, Denuvo starts writing a private key to the memory" and "then it fills the buffer at 000000014779F593. When everything is filled and the key is obtained by Denuvo itself, it starts executing anti-tamper checks from 000000014774C37E".

For the sake of convenience, we've omitted numerous memory addresses listed, because it's not a particularly compelling read if you're not tech savvy. Since cracking of Denuvo doesn't entail breaking it, but rather fooling it, the cracked version of Injustice 2 suffers from slowdowns as well, which Codex says is "thanks to Denuvo and the devs."

Now I'm not a proponent of illegal practices and I agree that intellectual property should be protected. However, the only ones being hurt by these invasive measures are we, the players. Denuvo is growing ever more hungry and I'm asking a simple question - how much will customers foot the bill of misguided corporate interests.

NetherRealm StudiosPoster for Warner Bros' Injustice 2, fighting game from DC UniverseInjustice 2

In layman's terms, and coincidentally much like any publisher would tell would tell you if it wasn't their problem to deal with - piracy is not my problem. So, remind me why exactly am I paying for it?

You can find Codex's reddit post along with plenty of technical details here.