Games News

I, Hope has been released on Steam, proceeds go to charity

GameChanger Charity
I, Hope logo
I, Hope

GameChanger Charity and Kenny Roy have partnered up to bring I, Hope to life, although not so as to stuff their pockets - all proceeds from the game will be going to charity, in order to help children who are suffering from cancer.

I, Hope has been released on Steam on 20 April 2018. At a glance, you'd be forgiven for mistaking it for one of Nintendo's Legend of Zeldas, as the players take control of Hope, a girl battling another kind of monster - cancer. It is available on Steam, with an Xbox One release in the near future.

The developer, Kenny Roy, had reached out to ID@XBOX to ask for assistance with development and publishing. He, along with any help he could muster, wanted to make a game for children suffering from cancer.

The game's entire theme is a metaphor since it starts with a giant monster called Cancer dropping from the sky and invading Hope's little island.

GameChanger CharityI, Hope logoI, Hope - Gaming sometimes makes a Paragon decision

Fans of the adventure genre might find it particularly interesting seeing as it is a mishmash of many titles from the genre. Players will have to do puzzles throughout the game, as well as combat enemies which are essentially the minions of Cancer.

I, Hope was initially funded on Indiegogo but ID@XBOX quickly picked it up for support in the development cycle. ID@XBOX is a program designed to help indie developers create and publish their games on the Windows and Xbox One platforms.

Seeing as how this title is currently only on Steam, we can assume its success might mean porting to other consoles and help support the fight against cancer.

The developer partnered up with GameChanger Charity in order to ensure the game's proceeds to go to donations for several charities such as scholarships for cancer surviving children and gifts for current patients.

GameChanger CharityI, Hope logoI, Hope - Gameplay footage

The charity of choice is the GameChanger Charity, who will ensure the dough raked in from the game's sales reaches those in need. They said their intention is "ease the pain and suffering of children facing life-threatening illnesses".

It isn't often that the gaming industry pulls a surprise with such a heartwarming pursuit of a noble cause, but this is most certainly one such case. Marrying art and humanism - what more could one ask?