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Fans are review bombing Pokemon Let's Go Pikachu and Eevee games

Game Freak
Screenshot of Pikachu listening to music in Pokemon: Let's Go, Pikachu!
Pokemon: Let's Go, Pikachu!

Pokemon: Let's Go is under heavy fire it seems, as both Pikachu and Eevee versions are receiving a lot of hate from fans who feel betrayed by Game Freak and pretty much anyone who could benefit from this perceived cash grab of a game.

Pokemon: Let's Go Pikachu! and Pokemon: Let's Go Eevee were enthusiastically received at first, debuting at #4 and #6 spots on the UK sales charts on the week of 12 November 2018. Fans became disgruntled rather quickly though as they seemingly realised the games are targetting a really young audience.

Players took to review bombing the games on Metacritic, with many posting the score of zero. Some of them had proper explanations behind their low score, but some seemingly did it just to vent their frustrations.

One user in particular, giving Pokemon: Let's Go Eevee! a review score 0/10, stated that the game was evidently made for children, four to five years old. They cited a few menu quirks as a proof of this theory, since the game asks you early on which language you want to play it in. It contains addendum, advising players to "ask an adult" to help them choose the language.

While the game being aimed at young children is not a bad thing in itself, the gameplay was apparently oversimplified. MrReviewerMan also alluded to their memories of playing the older Pokemon games back when they were in the children's shoes, stating that the new Pokemon titles can't compete at all.

While Metacritic review bombing was indeed severe, it appears that Amazon Japan had the toughest bit of fan rage. It appears that the outrage went so far as to force the site to remove the star rating of the product. Individual reviews can still be seen, although the aggregate score is invisible.

Game FreakScreenshot of Pikachu listening to music in Pokemon: Let's Go, Pikachu!Pokemon: Let's Go, Pikachu!

This also testifies that the outrage was worldwide, so people behind Pokemon: Let's Go games will have a hard time explaining themselves, as the review bombing can hardly be spun into placing the blame on localized, entitled or spoiled gamers.