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The Division singleplayer game may not be happening after all

Ubisoft
Screenshot from The Division of a player shooting the Looter faction
The Division - Where is my head? WHERE IS IT?!

Julian Gerighty mused about a potential singleplayer The Division game which sent the internet into a speculative frenzy over whether it could be in the works. Gerighty's latest tweets suggest that it was merely a thought, not a teaser.

Julian Gerighty started playing with The Division fans' hearts on Saturday, 13 July 2019, when he retweeted Tim Spencer's idea of a singleplayer entry in the series. Gerighty further provoked fans' hopes by asking for their thoughts on the matter.

The teasing continued about six hours later when Gerighty stated that the idea is not "something people are violently against", further hinting that this game may come to pass.

However, this idea was shot down soon after with another tweet from the director himself, replying to the previous ideas by saying it must be a slow news day at PCGamer, who already relayed the story about a potential singleplayer Division.

This is not the first time, even recently, that a major figure at a developer studio teased something just to pull the rug from under fans' feet not long after.

Marc Merril, the CEO and co-founder of Riot Games, pulled a similar stunt almost exactly one year prior when he teased League of Legends fans about a potential MMO set in the game's universe.

He later shot down the hopes of fans that spread faster than wildfire because everyone wanted another game from Riot. Technically we got one recently, but Teamfight Tactics is basically a new game mode that is Riot's take on auto chess instead of a fully fleshed MMO that everyone hoped for.

Then again, the lack of The Division narrative driven singleplayer may be for the best at the moment since Ubisoft is currently not exactly known as a company with great narrative experiences.

UbisoftScreenshot from The Division of a player shooting the Looter factionYeah, give us more drones and bullet sponges in a checklist setting with barely any story. That's enjoyable.

What's more, most of their games have the exact same framework and are starting to look like more of the same with each new title on the market. Ghost Recon Breakpoint is probably the worst offender here, leaving the game's roots in the dust as it now reminds of The Division more than it does of Ghost Recon itself.