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PUBG Mobile becomes the highest-grossing mobile game around

PUBG Corp
Picture of people parachuting to a murder zone in PUBG Mobile
PUBG Mobile

PUBG Mobile, Tencent's mobile edition of Bluehole's original game, has been doing great on its own, but its launch in China was stalled and even required a new name - Game for Peace. Combining their profits, however, shows the real picture.

On its own, PUBG Mobile made $76 million in May 2019, which is still a pretty good result all things considered.

However, adding the $70 million generated by Game for Peace brings this figure to $146 million, according to The Financial Times.

Game for Peace is a direct result of the Chinese government's gaming crackdown, which halted approvals of new games on the market for a while.

Having caused huge losses in the mobile gaming industry, ironically most notably to Tencent, Chinese publishing giant, China resumed issuing of licenses, but PUBG Mobile was deemed too violent to be left as is.

Tencent eventually removed all the murderous parts from the game, so Game for Peace plays like a training exercise. When killed, players leave behind boxes of goodies and wave, so as to indicate they're alive and well.

China's concerns over an alarming number of children with myopia, i.e. nearsightedness, meant that PUBG Mobile's developer had to instate age checks, so as to limit the playing time of underage players.

They eventually installed a system that reminds players to take breaks from PUBG Mobile, which Tencent claims is the first system of the type in mobile gaming.

As for the game's playerbase, back when PUBG dropped below 1 million concurrent monthly players, PUBG Mobile was already counting 20 million of them, with some nice revenues to boot.

There's no doubt Tencent are doing something right here, because as things stand, Honor of Kings, Tencent's mobile MOBA has only managed $125 million in revenue throughout May 2019.

Tencent GamesPicture of people parachuting to a murder zone in PUBG MobilePUBG Mobile

Of course, comparing the paid PC version of PUBG and a free-to-play mobile edition thereof isn't exactly a fair comparison, but it's peculiar seeing a once-wildly popular game lose to its mobile counterpart in pretty much every metric you choose to follow. 

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