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Chinese PC gamers will outpop the entire United States in 2023

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Market research firm Niko Partners has published a report on Chinese PC gaming and even though the results of the government's recent crackdown are still felt, the market remains the largest and most important gaming market in the world.

Just to put things into context, more than half of global PC online games revenue is from China, so even the 'most important' part somehow sounds like an understatement.

The country's domestic revenue was $15.21 billion in 2018 and by 2023, Niko Partners expect Chinese PC online game revenue to hit $16 billion.

China's gamer population has been steadily rising as well and the report claims that out of 312.4 million PC online gamers, 79.7 million actively spent money in games in 2018.

Moreover, Niko Partners expect this number to increase to 354 million in 2023, which means China will have more gamers than the US has people. 

We're not sure whether this metric accounts for population increase projections in the US, but that's not the point anyway. The point is, when looking at numbers alone, Chinese gamers are pretty much the backbone of the industry.

Tencent and NetEase remain the country's top publishers, and it's recently been revealed that Tencent alone account for 15 per cent of the global gaming revenue, which is truly impressive.

"Esports is currently the most important long-term driver of growth for the PC online games market. Esports game revenue was $6.3 billion in 2018, up 11.1% YoY and accounting for 41.4% of total PC online games revenue", the report reads.

China has a well-developed internet cafe culture, as evidenced by 138,000 internet cafes over the country, and their importance cannot be overstated, especially for those with esports aspirations. 

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Niko Partners expect the esports game revenue to reach $9.5 billion in 2023, which means it'll comprise 59.4 per cent of PC online games revenue.

Tencent have recently announced another round of age-checking mechanisms, after the first one apparently worked great, all stemming from the government's concerns over an increase in children with nearsightedness.

You can find the summary of Niko Partners report here.