Games News

11 bit studios raise $500,000 for charity via This War of Mine

11 Bit Studios
Promotional image for This War of Mine in gray background
This War of Mine

Paid DLC was hated almost since its inception, but the Polish developer 11 bit studios managed to turn it into a force for good. This War of Mine has a DLC named War Child Charity DLC that raised over $500,000 for children in war zones.

This War of Mine kicked off in 2014 with great success, and established a partnership with the British charity organisation War Child, which is dedicated to helping children who are stuck in war zones all over the world. The partnership gave birth to a set of downloadable content that can be purchased in three prices on Steam. Players get the same content, regardless of how much they pay for it.

That's not to say there is no difference in the amount paid though - 100 per cent of the proceeds go to the War Child organisation, the developers keep none of the money. That way, This War of Mine and 11 bit studios managed to raise over $500,000 for the charity. The money didn't come overnight though, as it the initiative started four years ago. 

Over the course of those four years, the money raised from This War of Mine players helped support building three temporary schools which helped around 260 students continue their education and exams. In Iraq, 457 managed to attend summer school thanks to the donations, while 840 younger children, aged four to six, received schooling in Afghanistan.

Other parts of the charity included 26 children finding new families to live with and helped 2215 children to find shelter in Democratic Republic of Congo. The video above showcased these achievements, ending with a show of This War of Mine related videos, with "WTF is... This War of Mine?" by the late TotalBiscuit in focus.

11 bit studiosPromotional image for This War of Mine in gray backgroundYou know Frostpunk, the game that keeps getting free DLC? Yup, it's the same studio

The charity DLC probably holds the best positive to negative review ratio, with 99 per cent of them being positive, while the six negative reviews can likely be attributed to trolls. It's worth mentioning that the initiative is still ongoing, and will likely raise even more money in the future.