Games News

PUBG Mobile's Royale Pass boosts revenue to $30 million

Tencent Games
A group of armed people on the poster for Tencent's PUBG Mobile
PUBG Mobile

The better side of PUBG Corp, those working on PUBG Mobile, have got a lot to pat themselves over the back for, as analysts showed that Tencent's game has tripled its overall revenue and average spending since Royale Pass was implemented.

Moreover, PUBG Mobile's daily revenue hasn't dropped a dime below $650K since the Royale Pass was introduced to the game back in June 2018. A worthy result indeed and even better when put into perspective.

It turns out that of the $30 million in total revenue, $22 million came after the Royale Pass came into the picture. Average daily spending on PUBG Mobile was at around $220 thousand prior to 19 June, which means that Royale Pass has almost single-handedly managed to increase revenue by 195 per cent. 

Okay, the single-handedly is stretching it a bit, especially seeing as how Tencent have actually done a great job with the game. Firstly and perhaps most importantly in my case - they fixed the game first and pushed cosmetics second, which is in sharp contrast to what the other part of the company has been doing for a while now.

All this, coupled with the Royale Pass has ensured that PUBG Mobile's daily revenue doesn't drop below $450 thousand, which is again a huge improvement over before, when the game refused to go over measly $343 thousand. Come 21 June 2018, the game actually racked up $1.1 million.

We're confident Tencent and PUBG Corp will be delighted with the news, since monetisation was the only missing link from PUBG Mobile. The game has been available on Android and iOS, unlike Fortnite, but even though it tripled Fortnite iOS downloads, this advantage didn't translate to sales.

Tencent GamesA group of armed people on the poster for Tencent's PUBG MobilePUBG Mobile

Thankfully, the company kept hacking away at PUBG Mobile, patiently polishing and tweaking the game further. Even their solution for people cheating by using keyboards and mice was genius, in that it was simple, effective, had no angry side effects and Tencent ended up being the good guy. Here's to hoping it spreads to the rest of the company.