Games News

Star Wars Battlefront 2 gets its microtransactions back

EA
A trooper in a field
Battlefront 2 - A photo of EA offices

EA brings back Battlefront 2's microtransactions. Even though the loot crates have been removed, the offer of buying cosmetics still stands. Either that or you're gonna have to grind for hours on end to get the skin you want in the game.

EA officially brought back microtransactions for cosmetics in Star Wars Battlefront 2 on 18 April 2018. Their long-awaited return means players can use premium funds called Crystals to purchase skins, emotes and other frivolous collectibles. The premium funds are, of course, bought with real life money.

EALoot boxes in a fieldBattlefront 2 - Loot boxes begone

Loot crates were removed from the game already, which was a do or die choice so the developers could attempt to save face, if only a little. Players now have the option to use in-game currency to unlock every cosmetic item there is.

The catch is you have to spend inhuman amounts of Credits, as some of the cheapest skins cost 20,000 Credits, while one game nets you around 200. For instance, you're gonna have to play around 80-100 matches for a Kylo Ren skin.

EAPink Darth VaderBattlefront 2 - Pink Darth Vader still not in the game... Why are we even here?

There is one good thing that comes out of all of this - removal of loot boxes. If you want an item, you either grind for it and pay with Credits, or go the questionably easier way and buy Crystals.

When we say good thing, we mean EA enticing players with shiny objects as if their player base consisted of monkeys.

EAEwok in a fieldBattlefront 2 - Hunt Ewoks in the latest update

The Star Wars Battlefront 2 controversy still looms over the company though, with their each step analysed with scrutiny. We're not sure whether they were hoping to boost revenue sales half a year later once they came back with a brand new system but we'll see soon enough.

In other news, the Netherlands have banned four games with loot boxes, and here's hoping to other countries finally cracking down on the gambling systems trying to weasel their way into gaming and distracting developers from making art into making more money.