Games News

SteamSpy may be shutting down thanks to Valve's new Steam privacy policy

Valve
Valve's Steam Platform
Valve's Steam Platform

It seems like Steam's updated privacy settings may be great for users, but not so great for companies that use it for other purposes, such as SteamSpy. Isn't it ironic that it's Steam killing off some of its best third-party services?

This is a direct result of Steam updating its privacy policy, where they tried to protect their users' data. Unfortunately, this means SteamSpy is out of bread and butter as the service tweeted that they will be unable to "operate anymore".

SteamSpy explained by saying that their company relied on this information to be "visible by default". Asked whether this means they'll be off the face of the Internet, the company tweeted they'll remain as an archive.

SteamSpy started on its path back in 2015 and has done more than its fair share of number crunching and analyses for the platform. In fact, among the more recent ones is the study that found how $20 games are actually Steam's bread and butter, rather than the previously touted $10 sweet spot.

To be fair, it has been suggested more than once that Steam's data policy was perhaps a bit too transparent. In light of the Facebook fiasco, it was high time Valve addressed this. After all, it's better they addressed it now, before Gabe Newell ends up before the Congress trying to weasel his way out of Zuckerberg's woes, as they will be commonly called.

AltCharSteam digital platform logo, PUBG logo and pot of goldPUBG, Steam's 3rd top earner

The Facebook fiasco further amplified the concerns over privacy and with world, dog and the latter's fleas talking about Facebook creator's appearance before the US Congress, it's no wonder Steam is upping its privacy game. 

Having said that, it seems that other than Steam actually employing SteamSpy and making them part of the company, there was never a future for Galyonkin's SteamSpy.

Some of gaming's more prominent PC publishers may already be rubbing their palms at this change, as the sales performance of their titles will become considerably less transparent. This means more control over the product and how it's perceived throughout its lifespan.

Valve are likely to respond to Galyonkin sooner or later, stay tuned.