Games News

Nintendo Labo Variety and Robot kit overview

Nintendo
Some of the possibilities for Nintendo Switch's controller conversion.
Nintendo Labo

Nintendo have shared a couple of instructional videos on their YouTube channel. The videos present and explain the possibilities of the upcoming Variety and Robot Nintendo Labo kits.

Nintendo have announced their Labo kits back in January, and now we have some more info about them thanks to a couple of instructional videos. The home-built kits made out of cardboard will interact with the Switch to make some interesting creations.

The three videos were shared on Nintendo Labo's YouTube channel, and they detail the contents of the kits as well as what you can use them for. 

The Variety kit includes an RC Car, fishing rod, house, motorbike, and a piano. You control the car by using the touchscreen. As it doesn't have any wheels, the car moves by way of Joy-Con vibrations. The car uses Joy-Cons' IR cameras to move towards designated markers even in the dark.

If you put two RC Cars together, they can have sumo style battles. The cars can be customized whichever way you like by cutting up an old shoebox.

One half of the fishing rod set uses your Joy-Cons and the other populates your Switch screen with schools of fish. You can keep the fish you happen to catch in an aquarium, and if you cut up a piece of paper and scan it you'll be able to make new species and enrich the (gene)pool.

The house from the Variety kit serves as a pet simulator. It's a home to a creature whose eyes are also its mouth. The house has three slots in which you can put multiple add-ons to make it do different things, from switching the lights on and off to flooding it.

A motorbike cardboard sleeve lets you experience all the fun of driving the real thing. It constantly reminds you that an accident in which you can end up with something protruding from your stomach is well within the realm of the probable, depending on your driving.

The Piano kit is pretty self explanatory, so we might as well skip it and take a look at the Robot kit. It contains a backpack, visor, some shoe-straps, and a pair of handheld "arms". Robot kit games are to be played while the Switch is docked.

Extending your arms while wearing the cardboard makes the robot punch stuff. Lifting your legs makes him walk. You get the gist. The in-game city is destructible and even encourages you to pummel it into the ground by offering up points. There is a bevy of additional modes and options explained in the accompanying video.

The Toy-Con garage will let you "invent" and experiment with a basic programming mode of sorts that allows you to change how your console interacts with the Toy-Con or reads actions.