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Monster Hunter: World looks like it's here to stay

Capcom
Monster Hunter: World logo
Monster Hunter: World

It seems like Monster Hunter: World has finally found the series' ideal mixture of game complexity and general appeal. Reviews and reactions of Western markets are mostly favourable, although they have been positive before yet still somehow failed to translate to proper sales.

We've already published our own review of Monster Hunter: World and we found it to be a seriously immersive, breakfast-forgetting experience. We've had some minor gripes over occasional, seemingly outdated graphics, but all in all - the game plays like a charm.

Capcom[undefined]Monster Hunter: World - Aloy skin

Now, Monster Hunter franchise's inability to force itself on the Western markets has never been about the game itself. The game was always praised by reviewers but several factors ended up undermining the entire experience.

Namely, the game had a seriously steep learning curve, which, considering the sheer scope of the game, indeed proved to be detrimental. This time however, devs seem to have struck gold and the game slowly sheds layers of complexity in a manner that's easy to comprehend and run with while you're showing the monsters who's boss.

Capcom[undefined]Monster Hunter: World

At press time, Twitch pegged the game at spot number 9, with around 11 thousand live viewers. True, the numbers are not that impressive and most certainly enough to challenge your regular mainstays of the popular video streaming platform, but a positive indicator of things to come - they most certainly are.

Do take into account that Monster Hunter: World only launched for consoles and any honest gamer knows well that the real fun starts later this year, when PC version comes into the fray. Monster Hunter World has already become Capcom's fastest selling title around the globe and if console numbers are anything to go by, the PC iteration should blow gamers away, and then some.