Games News

Star Wars Battlefront II: the return of the microtransactions

EA
Star Wars Battlefront 2 EA
Star Wars Battlefront 2

EA's finance chief Blake Jorgensen announced the return of the microtransactions in Star Wars Battlefront II. The system should be turned back on in the "in the next few months". 

Star Wars Battlefront II is getting its loot boxes back. Crack open that bottle of champagne you were saving for the birth of your first child. Let's see here. EA plans to reinstate the monetization feature in their Star Wars Battlefront II sometime "in the next few months". 

Blake Jorgensen, the company's finance chief said that they'll "do it when [they] think it's ready". It remains unclear whether he was doing his best Buffalo Bill impression or talking about the loot boxes.

EAAn excerpt from an article talking about the return of microtransactions to Star Wars Battlefront II Star Wars Battlefront II - loot boxes

EA turned off all in-game purchases in November 2017, after the open-beta backlash. The company never took their sights off of the piles of cash the loot boxes would bring however, and they always referred to them as something that's sure to make a come back whether we like it or not.

Jorgensen even blamed the fact Star Wars Battlefront II failed to reach the "conservative goal" of 10 million units in the holiday quarter on the microtransaction controversy. The game managed to move nine million copies. 

EA DICEStar Wars: Battlefront 2 loot crateStar Wars: Battlefront 2 - loot Crait

Last week, we got word that the game's progression system is under construction and is being "revamped". This could mean that the players will finally get to play as a pink Darth Vader even though it's not canon. Knowing EA though, it probably means that they'll introduce the microtransaction system back into the game without changing much else.

The loot box backlash lead to EA receiving the most downvoted comment in Reddit history, and prompted the Hawaii state legislators to consider a ban on the game and investigating what they call its "predatory practices."