New Releases

Middle-Earth: Shadow of War's Denuvo is de-gone

Monolith
Middle-Earth: SHadow of War Monolith
Middle-Earth: SHadow of War

Middle-Earth: Shadow of War's Denuvo software was cracked in less than 24 hours. At the end of September Total War: Warhammer 2 was cracked in only eight hours. Players have found that certain games performed worse due to the inclusion of Denuvo, as was the case with recent releases like Sonic Mania.

PC games these days come with anti-tamper ware Denuvo in order to discourage pirates from ripping illegal copies. As you can imagine, the Internet went and made cracking the software into a kind of sport.

Time required to crack a game's Denuvo is now measured in mere hours. Middle-Earth: Shadow of War was not immune to the plight as its anti-tamper ware got cracked in just 24 hours.

Monolith[undefined]Middle-earth: Shadow of War - The Agonizer

Denuvo first launched back in 2014. During its early days it caused a lot of headaches for the hacking groups as it could take months to crack the software. Just Cause 3 proved particularly tough because it used an updated version of Denuvo. Things seemed bleak for the hackers.

Recently, the same things have taken a 180° turn as it is now the hackers who are giving developers hell. It took just five days to get around the software in Rime and Resident Evil 7. At the end of September Total War: Warhammer 2  was cracked in only eight hours. The next day, it took around the same amount of time to crack Fifa 18.

The idea behind Denuvo was to fend off hackers at least for the crucial first few days, but that is no longer the case. With Denuvo not being able to guarantee it'll stop piracy, even for a couple of days, it’s looking more and more like a waste of money, time and player goodwill, since it also imposes several restrictions on legitimate users.

Monolith[undefined]Middle-Earth: Shadow of War

Players have found that certain games performed worse due to the inclusion of Denuvo, as was the case with recent releases like Sonic Mania. Publishers will sometimes remove the tech from their games themselves after players find a workaround, which happened with titles like Mass Effect: Andromeda.